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In Pictures: Morsi supporters march in Giza

Several marches took place Friday after noon prayers in support of ousted president Morsi. Protests called for the “downfall of the military coup” and for reinstating Morsi as president. Photos from the Dokki march and Al Nahda square

Daily News Egypt

What happened on 30 June?

I would have liked to answer the question: “where is Egypt going after 30 June?” but I discovered that I have to first explain what happened on 30 June. We have to put aside what is being said about a military coup, since facts confirm the size of public participation on 30 June. The second …

Farid Zahran

A petition to international media

By Ahmed El-Ashram I and millions of Egyptian people are following the international media coverage of recent developments in Egypt with profound disappointment. Unlike the revolution that ousted Hosni Mubarak from power, this one is met with abundant discontent and antipathy. Arguably, the precedent that this publicly-backed coup has set seems threatening to the US-planned …

Daily News Egypt

Split second

By Philip Whitfield Was it a coup d’etat, half a coup, coup-lite or just plain old martial law? The top brass gave Morsi just enough rope to hang himself to execute their mission: divide and rule. Not so fast, say some. It’s our revolution, not theirs. If you want to pray the worldwide court of …

Daily News Egypt

True people power in Egypt

Egypt has a rare opportunity to build a unique direct democracy – without a president or political parties – tailored to its needs that could also serve as a model for other Arab countries. In my previous article, I promised to outline a vision for Egypt’s democratic future. But in order to do so, we …

Khaled Diab

Dr H.A. Hellyer

Morsi’s best contribution to Egypt would be to make peace

“Help us make sense of this?” That is usually the question an analyst gets asked. The good ones tend to try their best, with as many qualifications as possible, knowing that they cannot possibly account for all the variables. They also know who else to direct people to, in order to get a wider, more …

Dr H.A. Hellyer

The unprofessional coverage of the ‘coup’

A coup d’etat is, according to Oxford English Dictionary, “a sudden, violent, and illegal seizure of power from a government”. According to western media, this is what happened in Egypt on 3 July. It’s all cut and dry for the all-knowing western media who decided to label what happened a “coup”, not caring for what …

Sara Abou Bakr

Ousting Morsi: A Pyrrhic victory?

Analysts and pundits inside and outside Egypt are deliberating and wondering what exactly happened in the country. People are asking questions such as: “Was it a coup d’état? What do the US and the world think of us?” Others are taking on the news channels and blogs, venomously rejecting the notion that this was indeed …

Dr Mohamed Fouad

Egypt’s coup de quoi!?

What happened in Egypt was not a ‘coup’. It was the millions on the streets, not dressed in khaki, who democratically ejected Morsi. Now they must finish the job of removing the military from politics. As an Egyptian abroad, I cannot but bow my head in admiration and appreciation at what my compatriots have achieved …

Khaled Diab

The Constituent Assembly of 1923 was composed of only 30 members Archive

Egypt’s Constitutional Experience

The current Constituent Assembly is the biggest in Egypt’s history. However, it is not just the number of constituency assembly members that distinguishes the current draft. The curious reader will also notice a comparative difference in the choice of words and sentence structures, exhibiting the current assembly’s lack of legal knowledge…

Sarah El Masry